Cooking Tips

Existential question time. If your sponge is filthy and smells, how can you expect it get your dishes clean?

A freezer full of roasted turkey necks and bony beef cuts will ensure you always have what you need to make broth.

Look, the 40-watt lightbulb in your oven hood isn’t going to cut it. Get a cheap clamp light from a hardware store so you can see what you’re doing.

Having cooked grains in your fridge means that fried rice, pilafs, rice bowls and robust salads are just minutes away.

Kitchen Mandolin SlicerWant gorgeous scalloped potatoes or perfectly julienned carrots? Buy a mandoline. Are you a scaredycat? Wear a cut-resistant safety glove until you feel comfortable bare-handed.

There’s nothing worse than limp herbs. Next time, trim the stems and put the parsley in a glass of water, fit a plastic bag over it, and stash it in the refrigerator.

Do your scrambled eggs slide off the pan if you don’t use oil or butter? They should. Might be time for an upgrade.

Ground spices die quickly. So give them a whiff—if they don’t smell like anything, they won’t taste like anything. And if they don’t taste like anything, you’re cooking with a flavorless, brown powder. It is better to have unground spices, if possible, and grind them fresh right when you need them.

Chicken breasts are expensive and can get dull after a while; thighs are juicier, cheaper, and more flavorful. Even for a couple without kids this is a great value. 

You may have a steel or a sharpener at home, but once a year, get a pro to revive those knives. Your chopping will get faster, more precise—and, believe it or not, safer.

Whisk a little salt and sugar into some white vinegar. Pour over thinly sliced raw vegetables. Wait 20 minutes. Eat.